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Pivot with Perseverance

Pivot with Perseverance

Pivot with Perseverance

Pivot with Perseverance

By: Amanda Kopischke

Pivot with Perseverance is one of Incubate to Innovate’s ChangeMaker Mindsets™. For many of us, we are facing a world that we did not expect.  Anxiety increases as we race to keep up and keep ahead of the game.  Solutions from the past are no longer working in the present. Strengthening adaptive capacity is greatly needed!

The mindset of Pivot with Perseverance asks a critical question: How can I embrace the challenge and opportunity life brings? The power of pivoting while using perseverance allows words, actions, thoughts, and attitudes to work together for good.   

Adaptive capacity is defined by Heifetz, Linksy, and Grashow as “the resilience of people and the capacity of systems to engage in problem-defining and problem-solving work in the midst of adaptive pressures and the resulting disequilibrium.”

I quickly learned that I was abiding in a state of constant frustration in a rapidly changing world and I needed to learn to Pivot with Perseverance.  The deeper transformative work was recognizing that pivoting for me was not the issue.  It was realizing the opportunities I had to pivot where my thought patterns, attitudes, and words could shift in a more positive direction in order to lead more effectively.

Pivoting with Perseverance is beautiful in how it changes your position, strategy, and trajectory, but it does not EVER distract from your overall purpose.

What areas of your life do you need to practice Pivoting with Perseverance?

How can you embrace both the challenges and joys that life brings? 

Are there people in your life that can help you to pivot and persevere? 

Ronald A. Heifetz, Marty Linsky, and Alexander Grashow, The Practice of Adaptive Leadership: Tools and Tactics for Changing Organizations and the World, Kindle ed. (Boston: Harvard Business Press, 2009) Ioc 4888-89.

 

The following post was taken from the ChangeMakers for Impact network, a part of Incubate to Innovate, a company that provides educators with best practices, tools, and an online collaborative network to transform teaching and learning experiences and environments using innovation to prepare students with 21st-century skills. To learn more, please click here.

Do You Own Your Own Story?

Do You Own Your Own Story?

Do you own your own story?

Do You Own Your Own Story?

By: Joanna Richter

Empowered people own their stories. They know where they have been – the struggles they have walked through, the joys they have experienced, and the people who have been their guides that has led them to where they are today. They see each season as a chapter in their overall story.

Each new school year students enter the classroom expecting to take in information their teachers tell them they need to know, but what if this year was different?! What if students entered the classroom this Fall ready for another chapter in their story where they would be empowered to own the struggles that come their way, seek guidance and solve problems?

Practically speaking, what does this look like? I once heard about a school where students don’t complain about aspects of school they dislike because the teachers and administrators take that as an opportunity to let the student seek out solutions. Might this be an opportunity for all of us, no matter what profession we are in? If people start to complain about something, we ask them to own the problem and become part of the solution?!

“Empowered students are those who see their story continue beyond the walls and doors of our schools, beyond the seven-hour days, and beyond the final bell” (Juliani & Spencer, 2017).

The amazing opportunity awaits our students each year to take a new journey in their story. The amazing opportunity for us lies in that we get the front row seat of our student’s journeys as we let them tackle problems and guide them on the journey.

The following post was taken from the ChangeMakers for Impact network, a part of Incubate to Innovate, a company that provides educators with best practices, tools, and an online collaborative network to transform teaching and learning experiences and environments using innovation to prepare students with 21st-century skills. To learn more, please click here.

Lead with Empathy

Lead with Empathy

MCA Holding Coffee Cups

Lead with Empathy

By: Amanda Kopischke

Lead with Empathy is one of Incubate to Innovate’s ChangeMaker Mindsets™. Empathy is defined as the ability to take someone else’s perspective and place yourself in their position while understanding and sharing their feelings.

The mindset of Lead with Empathy asks a critical question: How can I listen well with a heart for understanding for others and their feelings? Empathy is foundational to creating solutions and opportunities that effectively meet the needs of those around us in impactful ways.

Take a moment and ponder these questions:

How can I Lead with Empathy in my sphere of influence? At work? At home? At school?  In my community?

Empathy allows us to show compassion for human trials coupled with care to help solve problems and create opportunities.  This is authentic leadership in action!  However, the role of empathy in leadership is rarely discussed. Empathy moves beyond effective listening skills to understanding perspectives and fully engaging whether you agree or disagree.

Empathy doesn’t require that we have the exact same experiences as the person sharing their story with us…Empathy is connecting with the emotion that someone is experiencing, not the event, or the circumstance.” – Brene Brown

When Leading with Empathy is practiced and modeled in leadership, a cultural shift for the positive will occur.  Team members will soon begin to Lead with Empathy as well.  When a leader shows that they want to improve themselves and experience transformation by growing and learning, they tend to also attract people with the same values to join the team and the efforts toward a vision.  When we embrace this kind of mindset, the culture moves toward authentic compassion and collaboration.

In a complex and rapidly changing world, TRUST is gained when leaders make the courageous choice to Lead with Empathy.

What might it look like if you were purposeful in Leading with Empathy?

What are some next steps you can take to model this for others?

The following post was taken from the ChangeMakers for Impact network, a part of Incubate to Innovate, a company that provides educators with best practices, tools, and an online collaborative network to transform teaching and learning experiences and environments using innovation to prepare students with 21st-century skills. To learn more, please click here.

Who’s In Your Hive? The Power of Bees

Who’s In Your Hive? The Power of Bees

The Power of Bees

Who’s In Your Hive? The Power of Bees

By: Rachel Long

*Warning: this article may contain puns

We have all heard the buzzword “collaboration,” but how can we address that within our work? I came across an article this week from Schoology, that I thought asked a very important question, “Who’s in your hive?” (2019). While addressed to education, I think that this question can be applied anywhere as collaboration is a skill being called for in all places and spaces.

To first embrace the hive, I must identify the hive that is around me (2019). This is an important first step towards “building an engaged support system” around your work community so that “hive members understand their roles and connections” to the overall success of the hive (2019). In the busyness of today’s work environments, I find it easy to get caught up in my own snapshots of the hive from my perspective, but the power of bees is that they thrive on collaboration, and with so many of them all working together, that is an important skill to master. Consider your own hive.  I would bet that you have ten or more members that support your hive system, and engaging each member is important to ensuring long-term success. So how can one go about supporting the whole hive through collaboration?

I went about exploring the nature of bees and how I can work to “bee” more collaborative. That brought me to an article from the Smithsonian on “swarm intelligence,” and I found three takeaways from bees that I think we can be considered within our own hives:

  • Enthusiasm: when a bee scout finds a spot it would love to build a hive in, it comes back dancing to get the attention of the hive that it has a cool site to check out. How can we best share our enthusiasm and passion in the design ideas that we have with others? (2012)

  • Flexibility: do you know that the scout, once it finds a place, does not just dance once to convince the hive to move? Actually it will go back and forth multiple times, and if the site is not that good, eventually it will stop dancing all together. How cool is that? No one is stubborn saying that they have found the best spot, but they review it over and over again, letting the swarm decide which dance would lead to the best site for a new hive. How can this mentality of flexibility for finding the best hive be seen in our own workplaces? Is there a way to ensure that good ideas don’t lose out because they were not the first ones given? How about the evaluation of ideas to flexibly change postures, depending on what the design is calling for?

  • Solution-mentality: Do you know that once scouts have decided on locations they start to head butt each other? Like a debate, they are trying to get the dancing in one direction so that the collective can begin to swarm to the new hive. This act is “not about destroying the enemy, but about finding a solution for everyone” which fits the collective’s needs and goals. In what ways can our own systems be about finding solutions, instead of knocking down ideas?

My friends, may you seize the swarm this week in your work and find the joy in the collective around you. Oh, and sorry about all the bee puns, I know they can really sting (last one, I promise).


References

Larson, J. (2019). The secret to successful students: who’s in your hive. Retrieved from
https://www.schoology.com/blog/secret-to-successful-students on 6/21/19.

Zimmer, C. (2012). The secret life of bees. Retrieved from
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-secret-life-of-bees-99559587/ on
6/21/19.

The following post was taken from the ChangeMakers for Impact network, a part of Incubate to Innovate, a company that provides educators with best practices, tools, and an online collaborative network to transform teaching and learning experiences and environments using innovation to prepare students with 21st-century skills. To learn more, please click here.